Dexter Fergie

Sessional Lecturer
Regional Research Area
Education

MA, Northwestern University
MA, University of British Columbia
BA, University of British Columbia


About

I am a US and global historian, specializing in the history of international organizations, infrastructure, US foreign relations, and ideas.

As a doctoral candidate at Northwestern University, I am completing a dissertation, entitled “Headquartering the World: American Power and the Space of Global Governance, 1945-1980.” It asks how US hegemony has transformed both the international system and the United States. Focusing on the United Nations headquarters, my dissertation examines the consequences of locating the center of world government on US soil after the Second World War. I show how the location of the UN headquarters has entangled the United States and the world in ways that have both benefitted and troubled Washington.

I have been the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Scholarship, the Mackenzie King Traveling Fellowship, and the Truman Library Dissertation Year Fellowship.

Public History


Teaching


Publications

Select Publications


Dexter Fergie

Sessional Lecturer
Regional Research Area
Education

MA, Northwestern University
MA, University of British Columbia
BA, University of British Columbia


About

I am a US and global historian, specializing in the history of international organizations, infrastructure, US foreign relations, and ideas.

As a doctoral candidate at Northwestern University, I am completing a dissertation, entitled “Headquartering the World: American Power and the Space of Global Governance, 1945-1980.” It asks how US hegemony has transformed both the international system and the United States. Focusing on the United Nations headquarters, my dissertation examines the consequences of locating the center of world government on US soil after the Second World War. I show how the location of the UN headquarters has entangled the United States and the world in ways that have both benefitted and troubled Washington.

I have been the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Scholarship, the Mackenzie King Traveling Fellowship, and the Truman Library Dissertation Year Fellowship.

Public History


Teaching


Publications

Select Publications


Dexter Fergie

Sessional Lecturer
Regional Research Area
Education

MA, Northwestern University
MA, University of British Columbia
BA, University of British Columbia

About keyboard_arrow_down

I am a US and global historian, specializing in the history of international organizations, infrastructure, US foreign relations, and ideas.

As a doctoral candidate at Northwestern University, I am completing a dissertation, entitled “Headquartering the World: American Power and the Space of Global Governance, 1945-1980.” It asks how US hegemony has transformed both the international system and the United States. Focusing on the United Nations headquarters, my dissertation examines the consequences of locating the center of world government on US soil after the Second World War. I show how the location of the UN headquarters has entangled the United States and the world in ways that have both benefitted and troubled Washington.

I have been the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Scholarship, the Mackenzie King Traveling Fellowship, and the Truman Library Dissertation Year Fellowship.

Public History

Teaching keyboard_arrow_down
Publications keyboard_arrow_down

Select Publications