Shoufu Yin

Assistant Professor
location_on BuTo 1103, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

Regional Research Area

Education

PhD, UC Berkeley, 2021
MRes, KCL, 2014
MA, Uni Chicago, 2012
BA, Uni Hong Kong, 2009
Diplôme, Uni Lyon III 2008

About

Shoufu Yin is an assistant professor in history at the University of British Columbia. His research and teaching center on Chinese and Inner Asian political culture and thought in global historical contexts. Specializing in areas where cultural history meets comparative philosophy, he works on a wide array of previously unknown, untapped, and understudied sources in different languages—literary Sinitic (classical Chinese), Korean, Manchu, Mongolian, Persian, Latin, and Greek, to name a few. As such, his publications show that it is productive to engage the intellectual world of hitherto overlooked and marginalized groups—including peasant women who fought in wars, Manchu translators who processed imperial documents, anonymous typesetters behind the production of books. Ultimately, his scholarly passion lies in writing new kinds of global intellectual histories that foreground the theoretical contributions of both “canonical” and “everyday” thinkers of different traditions.

His current book manuscript, “The ‘Chinese’ Rhetorical Curriculum and a Transcultural History of Political Thought, ca. 1250–1650,” provides a new narrative of the history of early modern political thought by examining the rhetorical curriculum that flourished in East Eurasia. Tracing how the curriculum took its shape under Mongol-ruled China and flourished in post-Mongol East Eurasia, it contends that this education enabled individuals thus trained to conceptualize their rights vis-à-vis the throne, re-problematize the proper shape of the government, and conceive counterfactual histories and alternative futures. Simultaneously, he is publishing a series of articles, showing how seemingly formulaic documents from the past may shed light on themes of contemporary importance, including individual liberty, gender equality, environmental crisis, and human-animal relationships.

He is a member of the Advisory Council of the Association for Global Political Thought, Harvard University, and is organizing a series of workshops that facilitate further dialogues between digital humanities and computational social sciences.

Teaching

2022 Spring HIST 479A: Cultural History of Imperial China

2022 Spring HIST 321D/421D: History with Animals

2021 Fall HIST 378: History of Early China

This course explores the history of China from its origins until the thirteenth century. In terms of methodology, it introduces the crafts and toolkits by which historians understand the past—from source criticism to data visualization, from archaeological sciences to art historical analysis, as well as other methods. In terms of content, it helps us to understand Chinese cultures and societies through both well-studied and previously unknown materials. We shall divine with animal bones, dream with butterflies, retreat with elephants, build an empire/khanate from scratch, follow female commanders onto battlefields, and participate in voting and even the full-scale referendum. The course is open to all students, and no previous background in history or the Chinese language is required or expected.


Publications

  • “Liu Bei, Plato, et al. on Kingship: A Microhistory of Seventeenth-century Globalization and Political Thought.” In circulation/available upon request.

  • “The Early Qing Compilation of the Ming History in Manchu: The Contexts, Contents, and Significance of the Ming gurun i suduri, under review/available upon request.

  • Toward a Minimalist Approach to Democracy: Ideas Excavated from the First Large-scale Referendum in World History.” Under review and publicized via Social Science Research Network (SSRN). [SSRN version]

  • “Redefining Reciprocity: Appointment Edict and Political Thought in Medieval China,” Accepted for copyediting, Journal of the History of Ideas.

  • “Rewarding Female Commanders in Medieval China: Official Documents, Rhetorical Strategies, and Gender Order. Journal of Chinese History 6.1 (2022): 1-20. An earlier version of my manuscript, entitled On the Pseudo-Recognition of Female Commanders in Medieval China: War, Gender, and Imperial Rhetoric, is publicized via SSRN.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “Majority Rule in Imperial China.” The Cambridge History of Democracy, Volume 1: From Democratic Beginnings to c.1350. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “On Wen and Wu: Reading the Sunzi in Historical Context.” In Norton Critical Edition of The Art of War, edited by Michael Nylan. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2021.

  • “On the Importance of Having Atrocious Dreams: Social and Cultural Transformations of Tenth-Century China and Beyond” (in Chinese). Zaoqi zhongguoshi yanjiu 早期中國史研究 (Early and Medieval Chinese History) 12 (2020): 151-202. [publisher’s version]

  • Review of Nicolas Tackett, The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy.” Frontiers of History in China 9 (2014): 640–643. An expanded version in Chinese is published in Tang Song lishi pinglun 唐宋歷史評論 (The Tang and Song History Review) 1 (2015): 276–295. [publisher’s version]


Shoufu Yin

Assistant Professor
location_on BuTo 1103, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

PhD, UC Berkeley, 2021
MRes, KCL, 2014
MA, Uni Chicago, 2012
BA, Uni Hong Kong, 2009
Diplôme, Uni Lyon III 2008

Shoufu Yin is an assistant professor in history at the University of British Columbia. His research and teaching center on Chinese and Inner Asian political culture and thought in global historical contexts. Specializing in areas where cultural history meets comparative philosophy, he works on a wide array of previously unknown, untapped, and understudied sources in different languages—literary Sinitic (classical Chinese), Korean, Manchu, Mongolian, Persian, Latin, and Greek, to name a few. As such, his publications show that it is productive to engage the intellectual world of hitherto overlooked and marginalized groups—including peasant women who fought in wars, Manchu translators who processed imperial documents, anonymous typesetters behind the production of books. Ultimately, his scholarly passion lies in writing new kinds of global intellectual histories that foreground the theoretical contributions of both “canonical” and “everyday” thinkers of different traditions.

His current book manuscript, “The ‘Chinese’ Rhetorical Curriculum and a Transcultural History of Political Thought, ca. 1250–1650,” provides a new narrative of the history of early modern political thought by examining the rhetorical curriculum that flourished in East Eurasia. Tracing how the curriculum took its shape under Mongol-ruled China and flourished in post-Mongol East Eurasia, it contends that this education enabled individuals thus trained to conceptualize their rights vis-à-vis the throne, re-problematize the proper shape of the government, and conceive counterfactual histories and alternative futures. Simultaneously, he is publishing a series of articles, showing how seemingly formulaic documents from the past may shed light on themes of contemporary importance, including individual liberty, gender equality, environmental crisis, and human-animal relationships.

He is a member of the Advisory Council of the Association for Global Political Thought, Harvard University, and is organizing a series of workshops that facilitate further dialogues between digital humanities and computational social sciences.

Teaching

2022 Spring HIST 479A: Cultural History of Imperial China

2022 Spring HIST 321D/421D: History with Animals

2021 Fall HIST 378: History of Early China

This course explores the history of China from its origins until the thirteenth century. In terms of methodology, it introduces the crafts and toolkits by which historians understand the past—from source criticism to data visualization, from archaeological sciences to art historical analysis, as well as other methods. In terms of content, it helps us to understand Chinese cultures and societies through both well-studied and previously unknown materials. We shall divine with animal bones, dream with butterflies, retreat with elephants, build an empire/khanate from scratch, follow female commanders onto battlefields, and participate in voting and even the full-scale referendum. The course is open to all students, and no previous background in history or the Chinese language is required or expected.

  • “Liu Bei, Plato, et al. on Kingship: A Microhistory of Seventeenth-century Globalization and Political Thought.” In circulation/available upon request.

  • “The Early Qing Compilation of the Ming History in Manchu: The Contexts, Contents, and Significance of the Ming gurun i suduri, under review/available upon request.

  • Toward a Minimalist Approach to Democracy: Ideas Excavated from the First Large-scale Referendum in World History.” Under review and publicized via Social Science Research Network (SSRN). [SSRN version]

  • “Redefining Reciprocity: Appointment Edict and Political Thought in Medieval China,” Accepted for copyediting, Journal of the History of Ideas.

  • “Rewarding Female Commanders in Medieval China: Official Documents, Rhetorical Strategies, and Gender Order. Journal of Chinese History 6.1 (2022): 1-20. An earlier version of my manuscript, entitled On the Pseudo-Recognition of Female Commanders in Medieval China: War, Gender, and Imperial Rhetoric, is publicized via SSRN.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “Majority Rule in Imperial China.” The Cambridge History of Democracy, Volume 1: From Democratic Beginnings to c.1350. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “On Wen and Wu: Reading the Sunzi in Historical Context.” In Norton Critical Edition of The Art of War, edited by Michael Nylan. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2021.

  • “On the Importance of Having Atrocious Dreams: Social and Cultural Transformations of Tenth-Century China and Beyond” (in Chinese). Zaoqi zhongguoshi yanjiu 早期中國史研究 (Early and Medieval Chinese History) 12 (2020): 151-202. [publisher's version]

  • Review of Nicolas Tackett, The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy.” Frontiers of History in China 9 (2014): 640–643. An expanded version in Chinese is published in Tang Song lishi pinglun 唐宋歷史評論 (The Tang and Song History Review) 1 (2015): 276–295. [publisher's version]

Shoufu Yin

Assistant Professor
location_on BuTo 1103, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

PhD, UC Berkeley, 2021
MRes, KCL, 2014
MA, Uni Chicago, 2012
BA, Uni Hong Kong, 2009
Diplôme, Uni Lyon III 2008

Shoufu Yin is an assistant professor in history at the University of British Columbia. His research and teaching center on Chinese and Inner Asian political culture and thought in global historical contexts. Specializing in areas where cultural history meets comparative philosophy, he works on a wide array of previously unknown, untapped, and understudied sources in different languages—literary Sinitic (classical Chinese), Korean, Manchu, Mongolian, Persian, Latin, and Greek, to name a few. As such, his publications show that it is productive to engage the intellectual world of hitherto overlooked and marginalized groups—including peasant women who fought in wars, Manchu translators who processed imperial documents, anonymous typesetters behind the production of books. Ultimately, his scholarly passion lies in writing new kinds of global intellectual histories that foreground the theoretical contributions of both “canonical” and “everyday” thinkers of different traditions.

His current book manuscript, “The ‘Chinese’ Rhetorical Curriculum and a Transcultural History of Political Thought, ca. 1250–1650,” provides a new narrative of the history of early modern political thought by examining the rhetorical curriculum that flourished in East Eurasia. Tracing how the curriculum took its shape under Mongol-ruled China and flourished in post-Mongol East Eurasia, it contends that this education enabled individuals thus trained to conceptualize their rights vis-à-vis the throne, re-problematize the proper shape of the government, and conceive counterfactual histories and alternative futures. Simultaneously, he is publishing a series of articles, showing how seemingly formulaic documents from the past may shed light on themes of contemporary importance, including individual liberty, gender equality, environmental crisis, and human-animal relationships.

He is a member of the Advisory Council of the Association for Global Political Thought, Harvard University, and is organizing a series of workshops that facilitate further dialogues between digital humanities and computational social sciences.

Teaching

2022 Spring HIST 479A: Cultural History of Imperial China

2022 Spring HIST 321D/421D: History with Animals

2021 Fall HIST 378: History of Early China

This course explores the history of China from its origins until the thirteenth century. In terms of methodology, it introduces the crafts and toolkits by which historians understand the past—from source criticism to data visualization, from archaeological sciences to art historical analysis, as well as other methods. In terms of content, it helps us to understand Chinese cultures and societies through both well-studied and previously unknown materials. We shall divine with animal bones, dream with butterflies, retreat with elephants, build an empire/khanate from scratch, follow female commanders onto battlefields, and participate in voting and even the full-scale referendum. The course is open to all students, and no previous background in history or the Chinese language is required or expected.

  • “Liu Bei, Plato, et al. on Kingship: A Microhistory of Seventeenth-century Globalization and Political Thought.” In circulation/available upon request.

  • “The Early Qing Compilation of the Ming History in Manchu: The Contexts, Contents, and Significance of the Ming gurun i suduri, under review/available upon request.

  • Toward a Minimalist Approach to Democracy: Ideas Excavated from the First Large-scale Referendum in World History.” Under review and publicized via Social Science Research Network (SSRN). [SSRN version]

  • “Redefining Reciprocity: Appointment Edict and Political Thought in Medieval China,” Accepted for copyediting, Journal of the History of Ideas.

  • “Rewarding Female Commanders in Medieval China: Official Documents, Rhetorical Strategies, and Gender Order. Journal of Chinese History 6.1 (2022): 1-20. An earlier version of my manuscript, entitled On the Pseudo-Recognition of Female Commanders in Medieval China: War, Gender, and Imperial Rhetoric, is publicized via SSRN.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “Majority Rule in Imperial China.” The Cambridge History of Democracy, Volume 1: From Democratic Beginnings to c.1350. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

  • [with Michael Nylan] “On Wen and Wu: Reading the Sunzi in Historical Context.” In Norton Critical Edition of The Art of War, edited by Michael Nylan. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2021.

  • “On the Importance of Having Atrocious Dreams: Social and Cultural Transformations of Tenth-Century China and Beyond” (in Chinese). Zaoqi zhongguoshi yanjiu 早期中國史研究 (Early and Medieval Chinese History) 12 (2020): 151-202. [publisher's version]

  • Review of Nicolas Tackett, The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy.” Frontiers of History in China 9 (2014): 640–643. An expanded version in Chinese is published in Tang Song lishi pinglun 唐宋歷史評論 (The Tang and Song History Review) 1 (2015): 276–295. [publisher's version]