Paul Krause

Associate Professor Emeritus
phone 604 822 5168
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1122 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

About

Teaching and Supervision

Home Page for H334: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/h334_homepage.html

Home Page for Paul Krause: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/index.html

Office Hours:

Thursday: 14:00-15:00


Research

Current research

"Reconstructing Lost Lives in the Americas: The Story of Alexander and Margaret Chavous Proctor and their Family, 1700-2010"

This book manuscript, which is nearing completion, began as a section of a broad examination of the largely unexplored fact and continuity of African-American exile and emigration in the 19th and 20th centuries. As part of that investigation, I started documenting the lives of selected individuals who, between 1840 and 1940, left the United States for Canada, Haiti, France and Soviet Russia. My original intent was to include these narratives in a single book that would help to define the continuum of exile and emigration that has seen thousands of Americans of African ancestry leave the U.S. in search of a kind of freedom that has been unattainable in their native land. In particular, I wanted to cast some light on the comparative nature of, and responses to, racism and its various discourses in the U.S., in Canada, in France, and in Russia - societies which have produced generations of men and women who claim that the colour line is not a problem in their land. In my recent investigations of one family of Americans, the Proctors and Chavouses, however, I have come to realize that their story must stand on its own. To my surprise (and delight), their history has grown far beyond my initial conception of it; it now stretches backwards into the 17th century and forwards to the present day, raising new and intriguing questions about race and the history of race in the Americas. Just as I returned to Pittsburgh, my birthplace, to complete my book on the steel industry, this project, too, represents an effort to integrate some of the larger themes and problems in the humanities that I have tried to confront over the course of the last 25 years - as a journalist who has covered, and a teacher who has taught, the troubling course of race and race relations in the U.S. In this project, I find myself confronting yet again those questions of community, identity, and social justice that have long preoccupied me.

Research Interests

  • American history

Associated Research Clusters

Regional Clusters:

  • United States

Thematic Clusters:

  • Culture/Power/History
  • Ethnicity, Race, and Nationalism

Publications

Books

P. Krause. The battle for Homestead, 1880-1892: politics, culture, and steel. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992.

Articles/Book Chapters

P. Krause, “"Iron and Steel Industry," "Andrew Carnegie," and "Homestead Lockout"”, in The Oxford Companion to United States History, P. Boyer and al, et New York: Oxford University Press, In Press.

P. Krause, “On David Brody and Steelworkers in America: The Nonunion Era”, Labor History, vol. 34, pp. 489-498, 1993.

P. Krause, “East-Europeans in Homestead”, in ‘The River Ran Red’: Homestead, 1892, D. P. Demarest, Jr. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992, pp. 63-65.

P. KRAUSE, “THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BEESWAX TAYLOR - ORIGINS AND PARADOXES OF THE GILDED-AGE LABOR-MOVEMENT”, LABOR HISTORY, vol. 33, pp. 32-54, 1992.

P. Krause, “Rethinking the Homestead Lockout on the Fourth of July”, Pittsburgh History, vol. 75, no. Summer 1992, pp. 53-57, 108-09, 1992.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

Additional

P. Krause, “Workers' Aspirations, Historians' Anxieties”, Reviews in American History, vol. 21. pp. 400-406, 1993.


Awards

  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1989-90
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1993-94
  • UBC Hampton Grant
  • SSHRC

Paul Krause

Associate Professor Emeritus
phone 604 822 5168
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1122 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

Teaching and Supervision

Home Page for H334: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/h334_homepage.html

Home Page for Paul Krause: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/index.html

Office Hours:

Thursday: 14:00-15:00

Current research

"Reconstructing Lost Lives in the Americas: The Story of Alexander and Margaret Chavous Proctor and their Family, 1700-2010"

This book manuscript, which is nearing completion, began as a section of a broad examination of the largely unexplored fact and continuity of African-American exile and emigration in the 19th and 20th centuries. As part of that investigation, I started documenting the lives of selected individuals who, between 1840 and 1940, left the United States for Canada, Haiti, France and Soviet Russia. My original intent was to include these narratives in a single book that would help to define the continuum of exile and emigration that has seen thousands of Americans of African ancestry leave the U.S. in search of a kind of freedom that has been unattainable in their native land. In particular, I wanted to cast some light on the comparative nature of, and responses to, racism and its various discourses in the U.S., in Canada, in France, and in Russia - societies which have produced generations of men and women who claim that the colour line is not a problem in their land. In my recent investigations of one family of Americans, the Proctors and Chavouses, however, I have come to realize that their story must stand on its own. To my surprise (and delight), their history has grown far beyond my initial conception of it; it now stretches backwards into the 17th century and forwards to the present day, raising new and intriguing questions about race and the history of race in the Americas. Just as I returned to Pittsburgh, my birthplace, to complete my book on the steel industry, this project, too, represents an effort to integrate some of the larger themes and problems in the humanities that I have tried to confront over the course of the last 25 years - as a journalist who has covered, and a teacher who has taught, the troubling course of race and race relations in the U.S. In this project, I find myself confronting yet again those questions of community, identity, and social justice that have long preoccupied me.

Research Interests

  • American history

Associated Research Clusters

Regional Clusters:

  • United States

Thematic Clusters:

  • Culture/Power/History
  • Ethnicity, Race, and Nationalism

Books

P. Krause. The battle for Homestead, 1880-1892: politics, culture, and steel. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992.

Articles/Book Chapters

P. Krause, “"Iron and Steel Industry," "Andrew Carnegie," and "Homestead Lockout"”, in The Oxford Companion to United States History, P. Boyer and al, et New York: Oxford University Press, In Press.

P. Krause, “On David Brody and Steelworkers in America: The Nonunion Era”, Labor History, vol. 34, pp. 489-498, 1993.

P. Krause, “East-Europeans in Homestead”, in ‘The River Ran Red’: Homestead, 1892, D. P. Demarest, Jr. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992, pp. 63-65.

P. KRAUSE, “THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BEESWAX TAYLOR - ORIGINS AND PARADOXES OF THE GILDED-AGE LABOR-MOVEMENT”, LABOR HISTORY, vol. 33, pp. 32-54, 1992.

P. Krause, “Rethinking the Homestead Lockout on the Fourth of July”, Pittsburgh History, vol. 75, no. Summer 1992, pp. 53-57, 108-09, 1992.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

Additional

P. Krause, “Workers' Aspirations, Historians' Anxieties”, Reviews in American History, vol. 21. pp. 400-406, 1993.

  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1989-90
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1993-94
  • UBC Hampton Grant
  • SSHRC

Paul Krause

Associate Professor Emeritus
phone 604 822 5168
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1122 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

Teaching and Supervision

Home Page for H334: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/h334_homepage.html

Home Page for Paul Krause: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/pkrause/index.html

Office Hours:

Thursday: 14:00-15:00

Current research

"Reconstructing Lost Lives in the Americas: The Story of Alexander and Margaret Chavous Proctor and their Family, 1700-2010"

This book manuscript, which is nearing completion, began as a section of a broad examination of the largely unexplored fact and continuity of African-American exile and emigration in the 19th and 20th centuries. As part of that investigation, I started documenting the lives of selected individuals who, between 1840 and 1940, left the United States for Canada, Haiti, France and Soviet Russia. My original intent was to include these narratives in a single book that would help to define the continuum of exile and emigration that has seen thousands of Americans of African ancestry leave the U.S. in search of a kind of freedom that has been unattainable in their native land. In particular, I wanted to cast some light on the comparative nature of, and responses to, racism and its various discourses in the U.S., in Canada, in France, and in Russia - societies which have produced generations of men and women who claim that the colour line is not a problem in their land. In my recent investigations of one family of Americans, the Proctors and Chavouses, however, I have come to realize that their story must stand on its own. To my surprise (and delight), their history has grown far beyond my initial conception of it; it now stretches backwards into the 17th century and forwards to the present day, raising new and intriguing questions about race and the history of race in the Americas. Just as I returned to Pittsburgh, my birthplace, to complete my book on the steel industry, this project, too, represents an effort to integrate some of the larger themes and problems in the humanities that I have tried to confront over the course of the last 25 years - as a journalist who has covered, and a teacher who has taught, the troubling course of race and race relations in the U.S. In this project, I find myself confronting yet again those questions of community, identity, and social justice that have long preoccupied me.

Research Interests

  • American history

Associated Research Clusters

Regional Clusters:

  • United States

Thematic Clusters:

  • Culture/Power/History
  • Ethnicity, Race, and Nationalism

Books

P. Krause. The battle for Homestead, 1880-1892: politics, culture, and steel. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992.

Articles/Book Chapters

P. Krause, “"Iron and Steel Industry," "Andrew Carnegie," and "Homestead Lockout"”, in The Oxford Companion to United States History, P. Boyer and al, et New York: Oxford University Press, In Press.

P. Krause, “On David Brody and Steelworkers in America: The Nonunion Era”, Labor History, vol. 34, pp. 489-498, 1993.

P. Krause, “East-Europeans in Homestead”, in ‘The River Ran Red’: Homestead, 1892, D. P. Demarest, Jr. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992, pp. 63-65.

P. KRAUSE, “THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BEESWAX TAYLOR - ORIGINS AND PARADOXES OF THE GILDED-AGE LABOR-MOVEMENT”, LABOR HISTORY, vol. 33, pp. 32-54, 1992.

P. Krause, “Rethinking the Homestead Lockout on the Fourth of July”, Pittsburgh History, vol. 75, no. Summer 1992, pp. 53-57, 108-09, 1992.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

P. Krause, “Patronage and Philanthropy in Industrial America: Andrew Carnegie and the Free Library in Braddock, Pennsylvania”, Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol. 71, no. April 1988, pp. 127-145, 1988.

Additional

P. Krause, “Workers' Aspirations, Historians' Anxieties”, Reviews in American History, vol. 21. pp. 400-406, 1993.

  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1989-90
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 1993-94
  • UBC Hampton Grant
  • SSHRC