Meghan Longstaffe

PhD Student

Education

MA History, University of British Columbia, 2010
BA (Honours) History, Queen's University, 2007

About

Teaching and Supervision

Instructor, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 415, History of Vancouver (Winter, Term 2, 2020)

Teaching Assistant, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 106, Global Environmental History (Winter, Term 1, 2016)
  • History 235, History of Canada: Moments that Matter (Winter, Term 1, 2015)

Research

A settler who lives and works on unceded Coast Salish territories, I am an historian of gender, poverty, activism, and colonialism in late-twentieth-century urban Canada.

In my dissertation, “Gendered Precarity and the Politics of Care: Home and Homelessness in Downtown Eastside Vancouver, 1960s-1980s,” I use diverse documentary and oral history sources to examine how women understood and responded to poverty in a low-income Vancouver neighbourhood in the late twentieth century. In this work, I analyze of the causes and configurations of women's poverty alongside women’s creative resilience and resistance in the face of it. Through this research, I seek to uncover the historical roots of contemporary crises -- from homelessness to gendered and racialized violence -- that shape our present, and to extend and deepen knowledge of the pivotal role of women in building community, making the city, and creating social change.

Research Interest

  • Canada
  • women and gender
  • settler colonialism
  • housing and homelessness
  • poverty
  • violence
  • social determinants of health
  • social movements
  • oral history

Publications

Articles/Book Chapters

Meghan Longstaffe, “Indigenous Women as Newspaper Representations: Violence and Action in 1960s Vancouver,” Canadian Historical Review 98, 2 (June 2017): 230-260.


Meghan Longstaffe

PhD Student

MA History, University of British Columbia, 2010
BA (Honours) History, Queen's University, 2007

Teaching and Supervision

Instructor, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 415, History of Vancouver (Winter, Term 2, 2020)

Teaching Assistant, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 106, Global Environmental History (Winter, Term 1, 2016)
  • History 235, History of Canada: Moments that Matter (Winter, Term 1, 2015)

A settler who lives and works on unceded Coast Salish territories, I am an historian of gender, poverty, activism, and colonialism in late-twentieth-century urban Canada.

In my dissertation, “Gendered Precarity and the Politics of Care: Home and Homelessness in Downtown Eastside Vancouver, 1960s-1980s,” I use diverse documentary and oral history sources to examine how women understood and responded to poverty in a low-income Vancouver neighbourhood in the late twentieth century. In this work, I analyze of the causes and configurations of women's poverty alongside women’s creative resilience and resistance in the face of it. Through this research, I seek to uncover the historical roots of contemporary crises -- from homelessness to gendered and racialized violence -- that shape our present, and to extend and deepen knowledge of the pivotal role of women in building community, making the city, and creating social change.

Research Interest

  • Canada
  • women and gender
  • settler colonialism
  • housing and homelessness
  • poverty
  • violence
  • social determinants of health
  • social movements
  • oral history

Articles/Book Chapters

Meghan Longstaffe, “Indigenous Women as Newspaper Representations: Violence and Action in 1960s Vancouver,” Canadian Historical Review 98, 2 (June 2017): 230-260.

Meghan Longstaffe

PhD Student

MA History, University of British Columbia, 2010
BA (Honours) History, Queen's University, 2007

Teaching and Supervision

Instructor, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 415, History of Vancouver (Winter, Term 2, 2020)

Teaching Assistant, Department of History, University of British Columbia

  • History 106, Global Environmental History (Winter, Term 1, 2016)
  • History 235, History of Canada: Moments that Matter (Winter, Term 1, 2015)

A settler who lives and works on unceded Coast Salish territories, I am an historian of gender, poverty, activism, and colonialism in late-twentieth-century urban Canada.

In my dissertation, “Gendered Precarity and the Politics of Care: Home and Homelessness in Downtown Eastside Vancouver, 1960s-1980s,” I use diverse documentary and oral history sources to examine how women understood and responded to poverty in a low-income Vancouver neighbourhood in the late twentieth century. In this work, I analyze of the causes and configurations of women's poverty alongside women’s creative resilience and resistance in the face of it. Through this research, I seek to uncover the historical roots of contemporary crises -- from homelessness to gendered and racialized violence -- that shape our present, and to extend and deepen knowledge of the pivotal role of women in building community, making the city, and creating social change.

Research Interest

  • Canada
  • women and gender
  • settler colonialism
  • housing and homelessness
  • poverty
  • violence
  • social determinants of health
  • social movements
  • oral history

Articles/Book Chapters

Meghan Longstaffe, “Indigenous Women as Newspaper Representations: Violence and Action in 1960s Vancouver,” Canadian Historical Review 98, 2 (June 2017): 230-260.