Laura Ishiguro

Associate Professor
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1110 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

Research Area

Education

PhD, University College London, 2011
MA, Simon Fraser University, 2008
BA Honours, University of Victoria, 2006

Research

I am a social historian of settler colonialism and empire in northern North America (Canada) and the British Empire, with a particular specialization in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century history of British Columbia. Both deeply rooted in place and transnational in its framing, my recent work has been underpinned by my broad contention that family, affect, and the everyday have been critical parts of settler colonial projects – intimate and political histories at the foundations of the world in which we live today.

My first book, Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia, came out with UBC Press in 2019. A detailed study of thousands of British family letters written between the United Kingdom and British Columbia, this work elucidates the critical, entwined, and otherwise unexamined role of trans-imperial families and the everyday in the making of a white settler society.

 


Publications

Books

L. Ishiguro. Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

L. Ishiguro and Madokoro, L., “White Supremacy, Political Violence, and Community: The Questions We Ask, from 1907 to 2017”, in Confronting Canadian Migration History , D. Ross Active History, 2019, pp. 77-83.

L. Ishiguro, “'A Dreadful Little Glutton Always Telling You About Food': The Epistolary Everyday and the Making of Settler Colonial British Columbia”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 258-283, 2018.

L. Ishiguro, “Northwestern North America (Canadian West) to 1900”, in The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism, E. Cavanagh and Veracini, L. New York: Routledge, 2017, pp. 125-138.

L. Ishiguro, “"Growing up and grown up […] in our future city": children and the aspirational politics of settler futurity in colonial British Columbia”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 15-37, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism: Considering New Currents”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 5–14, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “How I wish I might be near: distance and the epistolary family in late nineteenth-century condolence letters”, in Within and Without the Nation: Canadian History as Transnational History, K. Dubinsky, Perry, A., and Yu, H. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015, pp. 212-227.

L. Ishiguro, “Material girls: daughters, dress, and distance in the trans-imperial family”, in Colonial Girlhood in Literature, Culture and History, 1840-1950, K. Moruzi and Smith, M. J. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, pp. 214-227.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Imperial Relations: Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, p. N_A, 2013.

Edited Work

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190. 2016.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, no. 1. 2013.

Reviews

L. Ishiguro, “Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the Imperial Press, by Kenton Storey”, Pacific Historical Review , vol. 86, no. 4. pp. 733-734, 2017.

L. Ishiguro, “Men and Manliness on the Frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the Mid-Nineteenth Century, by Robert Hogg”, BC Studies, vol. 189. pp. 166-167, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest, by Jean Barman”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 96, no. 4. pp. 604-606, 2015.

L. Ishiguro, “Settlers and Expatriates: Britons over the seas, edited by Robert Bickers”, Journal of Colonialism & Colonial History, vol. 14. p. N_A, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society, by Lesley Erickson”, Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies, vol. 18, no. 1. pp. 91–92, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Sister and I: From Victoria to London, by Emily Carr, edited by Kathryn Bridge”, BC Studies. p. 141, 2012.

L. Ishiguro, “Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th Century Pacific Rim Cities, by Penelope Edmonds”, JOURNAL OF IMPERIAL AND COMMONWEALTH HISTORY, vol. 39. pp. 521-U177, 2011.

L. Ishiguro, “Stories of Stories: Examining Ethnography through Biography”, Topia. p. 235, 2008.


Awards


Laura Ishiguro

Associate Professor
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1110 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

PhD, University College London, 2011
MA, Simon Fraser University, 2008
BA Honours, University of Victoria, 2006

I am a social historian of settler colonialism and empire in northern North America (Canada) and the British Empire, with a particular specialization in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century history of British Columbia. Both deeply rooted in place and transnational in its framing, my recent work has been underpinned by my broad contention that family, affect, and the everyday have been critical parts of settler colonial projects – intimate and political histories at the foundations of the world in which we live today.

My first book, Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia, came out with UBC Press in 2019. A detailed study of thousands of British family letters written between the United Kingdom and British Columbia, this work elucidates the critical, entwined, and otherwise unexamined role of trans-imperial families and the everyday in the making of a white settler society.

 

Books

L. Ishiguro. Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

L. Ishiguro and Madokoro, L., “White Supremacy, Political Violence, and Community: The Questions We Ask, from 1907 to 2017”, in Confronting Canadian Migration History , D. Ross Active History, 2019, pp. 77-83.

L. Ishiguro, “'A Dreadful Little Glutton Always Telling You About Food': The Epistolary Everyday and the Making of Settler Colonial British Columbia”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 258-283, 2018.

L. Ishiguro, “Northwestern North America (Canadian West) to 1900”, in The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism, E. Cavanagh and Veracini, L. New York: Routledge, 2017, pp. 125-138.

L. Ishiguro, “"Growing up and grown up […] in our future city": children and the aspirational politics of settler futurity in colonial British Columbia”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 15-37, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism: Considering New Currents”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 5–14, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “How I wish I might be near: distance and the epistolary family in late nineteenth-century condolence letters”, in Within and Without the Nation: Canadian History as Transnational History, K. Dubinsky, Perry, A., and Yu, H. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015, pp. 212-227.

L. Ishiguro, “Material girls: daughters, dress, and distance in the trans-imperial family”, in Colonial Girlhood in Literature, Culture and History, 1840-1950, K. Moruzi and Smith, M. J. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, pp. 214-227.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Imperial Relations: Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, p. N_A, 2013.

Edited Work

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190. 2016.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, no. 1. 2013.

Reviews

L. Ishiguro, “Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the Imperial Press, by Kenton Storey”, Pacific Historical Review , vol. 86, no. 4. pp. 733-734, 2017.

L. Ishiguro, “Men and Manliness on the Frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the Mid-Nineteenth Century, by Robert Hogg”, BC Studies, vol. 189. pp. 166-167, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest, by Jean Barman”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 96, no. 4. pp. 604-606, 2015.

L. Ishiguro, “Settlers and Expatriates: Britons over the seas, edited by Robert Bickers”, Journal of Colonialism & Colonial History, vol. 14. p. N_A, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society, by Lesley Erickson”, Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies, vol. 18, no. 1. pp. 91–92, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Sister and I: From Victoria to London, by Emily Carr, edited by Kathryn Bridge”, BC Studies. p. 141, 2012.

L. Ishiguro, “Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th Century Pacific Rim Cities, by Penelope Edmonds”, JOURNAL OF IMPERIAL AND COMMONWEALTH HISTORY, vol. 39. pp. 521-U177, 2011.

L. Ishiguro, “Stories of Stories: Examining Ethnography through Biography”, Topia. p. 235, 2008.

Laura Ishiguro

Associate Professor
location_on Buchanan Tower 1873 East Mall Room 1110 V6T1Z1 Vancouver , BC Canada

PhD, University College London, 2011
MA, Simon Fraser University, 2008
BA Honours, University of Victoria, 2006

I am a social historian of settler colonialism and empire in northern North America (Canada) and the British Empire, with a particular specialization in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century history of British Columbia. Both deeply rooted in place and transnational in its framing, my recent work has been underpinned by my broad contention that family, affect, and the everyday have been critical parts of settler colonial projects – intimate and political histories at the foundations of the world in which we live today.

My first book, Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia, came out with UBC Press in 2019. A detailed study of thousands of British family letters written between the United Kingdom and British Columbia, this work elucidates the critical, entwined, and otherwise unexamined role of trans-imperial families and the everyday in the making of a white settler society.

 

Books

L. Ishiguro. Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

L. Ishiguro and Madokoro, L., “White Supremacy, Political Violence, and Community: The Questions We Ask, from 1907 to 2017”, in Confronting Canadian Migration History , D. Ross Active History, 2019, pp. 77-83.

L. Ishiguro, “'A Dreadful Little Glutton Always Telling You About Food': The Epistolary Everyday and the Making of Settler Colonial British Columbia”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 258-283, 2018.

L. Ishiguro, “Northwestern North America (Canadian West) to 1900”, in The Routledge Handbook of the History of Settler Colonialism, E. Cavanagh and Veracini, L. New York: Routledge, 2017, pp. 125-138.

L. Ishiguro, “"Growing up and grown up […] in our future city": children and the aspirational politics of settler futurity in colonial British Columbia”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 15-37, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism: Considering New Currents”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190, pp. 5–14, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “How I wish I might be near: distance and the epistolary family in late nineteenth-century condolence letters”, in Within and Without the Nation: Canadian History as Transnational History, K. Dubinsky, Perry, A., and Yu, H. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015, pp. 212-227.

L. Ishiguro, “Material girls: daughters, dress, and distance in the trans-imperial family”, in Colonial Girlhood in Literature, Culture and History, 1840-1950, K. Moruzi and Smith, M. J. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, pp. 214-227.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Imperial Relations: Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, p. N_A, 2013.

Edited Work

L. Ishiguro, “Histories of Settler Colonialism”, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, vol. 190. 2016.

E. Cleall, Ishiguro, L., and Manktelow, E. J., “Histories of family in the British Empire”, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, vol. 14, no. 1. 2013.

Reviews

L. Ishiguro, “Settler Anxiety at the Outposts of Empire: Colonial Relations, Humanitarian Discourses, and the Imperial Press, by Kenton Storey”, Pacific Historical Review , vol. 86, no. 4. pp. 733-734, 2017.

L. Ishiguro, “Men and Manliness on the Frontier: Queensland and British Columbia in the Mid-Nineteenth Century, by Robert Hogg”, BC Studies, vol. 189. pp. 166-167, 2016.

L. Ishiguro, “French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest, by Jean Barman”, Canadian Historical Review, vol. 96, no. 4. pp. 604-606, 2015.

L. Ishiguro, “Settlers and Expatriates: Britons over the seas, edited by Robert Bickers”, Journal of Colonialism & Colonial History, vol. 14. p. N_A, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society, by Lesley Erickson”, Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies, vol. 18, no. 1. pp. 91–92, 2013.

L. Ishiguro, “Sister and I: From Victoria to London, by Emily Carr, edited by Kathryn Bridge”, BC Studies. p. 141, 2012.

L. Ishiguro, “Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th Century Pacific Rim Cities, by Penelope Edmonds”, JOURNAL OF IMPERIAL AND COMMONWEALTH HISTORY, vol. 39. pp. 521-U177, 2011.

L. Ishiguro, “Stories of Stories: Examining Ethnography through Biography”, Topia. p. 235, 2008.