David Morton

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 5195
location_on Ponderosa Annex E 221, 2034 Main Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z2, Canada

Research Area

Education

PhD African History, University of Minnesota, 2015
BA History, Yale University, 1997

About

I am a historian of modern southern Africa, of African urbanism, and of decolonization, with specific expertise in informal settlement and in the histories of Mozambique and its capital Maputo.

 

My 2019 book, Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique (Ohio UP) makes use of an enormous if underutilized open-air historical archive: the streetscape of Maputo’s subúrbios, informal areas where most of the city’s population has lived, now and in the past. Neighborhoods such as these, the norm in cities across Africa, usually appear in urban histories as undifferentiated, ahistorical shantytowns­­, and in policy briefs as problems to be solved. But the subúrbios are almost as old as Maputo itself. Each of the houses there, built incrementally over a lifetime and more, represents a household’s greatest single investment and largest bequest to generations that follow. The story of house construction in the subúrbios, on tenuous ground and in trying circumstances, is simultaneously a history of how people in Maputo have related to each other and to the colonial and then postcolonial state. Political history is in this sense material history. (The New Books Network podcast interviewed me about the book here.)

 

My newest project, “A State at Year Zero: An Oral History of Mozambique’s Independence,” funded by a SSHRC Insight Grant from the government of Canada, focuses on the very first flush of independence: the months just before and just after a new flag was flown, on June 25, 1975. People at all levels of Mozambican society were attempting to interpret the colonial past, and rapidly address it, at the very moment that era officially became the past. For these first postcolonial theorists, as it were—government ministers, but also schoolteachers, doctors, nurses, and countless others—the emergency-like circumstances of the time, well before true planning took place, were also opportunities for discovery: of the state bureaucracy and how it worked, and also of Mozambican society in all its diversity.

 

I primarily teach courses in African history: History of Africa (256), an introductory course emphasizing the pre-colonial era; Modern Africa (313), a survey c. 1800 to the present; and Southern Africa (312), which emphasizes the history of South Africa. I also semi-regularly teach Cities in History (104), an introductory course in global urban history, as well as seminars in decolonization and in the writing of history. Beginning this spring, I will be teaching The Theory and Practice of History (399).


Research

Research Interests

  • urban Africa
  • architecture and planning in history
  • informal settlement, housing, and citizenship
  • Mozambique in the twentieth century
  • Portuguese colonialism

Publications

Books

Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

Maputo.” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of African History (forthcoming).

The Shape of Aspiration: Clandestine Masonry House Construction in Lourenço Marques, Mozambique (1960-75).” Journal of African History 59, no. 2 (2018): 283-304.

A Voortrekker Memorial in Revolutionary Maputo.” Journal of Southern African Studies 41, no. 2 (2015): 335-352.

Chamanculo in Reeds, Wood, Zinc & Concrete.” S.L.U.M. Lab, no. 9 (2014): 43–46.

From Racial Discrimination to Class Segregation in Postcolonial Urban Mozambique.” In Geographies of Privilege, edited by France Winddance Twine and Bradley Gardener, 231-261. London: Routledge, 2013.

(with Allen F. Isaacman) “Harnessing the Zambezi: How Mozambique’s Planned Mphanda Nkuwa Dam Perpetuates the Colonial Past.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 45, no. 2 (2012): 157-190.


Graduate Supervision

Aaron Wilford, M.A. student

Jake Harms, M.A. student


Additional Description

Hotel Universo, my research blog, has long been on hiatus, but it stores dozens of entries on the histories of Mozambique, Portugal, and elsewhere.


David Morton

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 5195
location_on Ponderosa Annex E 221, 2034 Main Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z2, Canada

PhD African History, University of Minnesota, 2015
BA History, Yale University, 1997

I am a historian of modern southern Africa, of African urbanism, and of decolonization, with specific expertise in informal settlement and in the histories of Mozambique and its capital Maputo.

 

My 2019 book, Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique (Ohio UP) makes use of an enormous if underutilized open-air historical archive: the streetscape of Maputo’s subúrbios, informal areas where most of the city’s population has lived, now and in the past. Neighborhoods such as these, the norm in cities across Africa, usually appear in urban histories as undifferentiated, ahistorical shantytowns­­, and in policy briefs as problems to be solved. But the subúrbios are almost as old as Maputo itself. Each of the houses there, built incrementally over a lifetime and more, represents a household’s greatest single investment and largest bequest to generations that follow. The story of house construction in the subúrbios, on tenuous ground and in trying circumstances, is simultaneously a history of how people in Maputo have related to each other and to the colonial and then postcolonial state. Political history is in this sense material history. (The New Books Network podcast interviewed me about the book here.)

 

My newest project, “A State at Year Zero: An Oral History of Mozambique’s Independence,” funded by a SSHRC Insight Grant from the government of Canada, focuses on the very first flush of independence: the months just before and just after a new flag was flown, on June 25, 1975. People at all levels of Mozambican society were attempting to interpret the colonial past, and rapidly address it, at the very moment that era officially became the past. For these first postcolonial theorists, as it were—government ministers, but also schoolteachers, doctors, nurses, and countless others—the emergency-like circumstances of the time, well before true planning took place, were also opportunities for discovery: of the state bureaucracy and how it worked, and also of Mozambican society in all its diversity.

 

I primarily teach courses in African history: History of Africa (256), an introductory course emphasizing the pre-colonial era; Modern Africa (313), a survey c. 1800 to the present; and Southern Africa (312), which emphasizes the history of South Africa. I also semi-regularly teach Cities in History (104), an introductory course in global urban history, as well as seminars in decolonization and in the writing of history. Beginning this spring, I will be teaching The Theory and Practice of History (399).

Research Interests

  • urban Africa
  • architecture and planning in history
  • informal settlement, housing, and citizenship
  • Mozambique in the twentieth century
  • Portuguese colonialism

Books

Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

Maputo.” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of African History (forthcoming).

The Shape of Aspiration: Clandestine Masonry House Construction in Lourenço Marques, Mozambique (1960-75).” Journal of African History 59, no. 2 (2018): 283-304.

A Voortrekker Memorial in Revolutionary Maputo.” Journal of Southern African Studies 41, no. 2 (2015): 335-352.

Chamanculo in Reeds, Wood, Zinc & Concrete.” S.L.U.M. Lab, no. 9 (2014): 43–46.

From Racial Discrimination to Class Segregation in Postcolonial Urban Mozambique.” In Geographies of Privilege, edited by France Winddance Twine and Bradley Gardener, 231-261. London: Routledge, 2013.

(with Allen F. Isaacman) “Harnessing the Zambezi: How Mozambique’s Planned Mphanda Nkuwa Dam Perpetuates the Colonial Past.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 45, no. 2 (2012): 157-190.

Aaron Wilford, M.A. student

Jake Harms, M.A. student

Hotel Universo, my research blog, has long been on hiatus, but it stores dozens of entries on the histories of Mozambique, Portugal, and elsewhere.

David Morton

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 5195
location_on Ponderosa Annex E 221, 2034 Main Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z2, Canada

PhD African History, University of Minnesota, 2015
BA History, Yale University, 1997

I am a historian of modern southern Africa, of African urbanism, and of decolonization, with specific expertise in informal settlement and in the histories of Mozambique and its capital Maputo.

 

My 2019 book, Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique (Ohio UP) makes use of an enormous if underutilized open-air historical archive: the streetscape of Maputo’s subúrbios, informal areas where most of the city’s population has lived, now and in the past. Neighborhoods such as these, the norm in cities across Africa, usually appear in urban histories as undifferentiated, ahistorical shantytowns­­, and in policy briefs as problems to be solved. But the subúrbios are almost as old as Maputo itself. Each of the houses there, built incrementally over a lifetime and more, represents a household’s greatest single investment and largest bequest to generations that follow. The story of house construction in the subúrbios, on tenuous ground and in trying circumstances, is simultaneously a history of how people in Maputo have related to each other and to the colonial and then postcolonial state. Political history is in this sense material history. (The New Books Network podcast interviewed me about the book here.)

 

My newest project, “A State at Year Zero: An Oral History of Mozambique’s Independence,” funded by a SSHRC Insight Grant from the government of Canada, focuses on the very first flush of independence: the months just before and just after a new flag was flown, on June 25, 1975. People at all levels of Mozambican society were attempting to interpret the colonial past, and rapidly address it, at the very moment that era officially became the past. For these first postcolonial theorists, as it were—government ministers, but also schoolteachers, doctors, nurses, and countless others—the emergency-like circumstances of the time, well before true planning took place, were also opportunities for discovery: of the state bureaucracy and how it worked, and also of Mozambican society in all its diversity.

 

I primarily teach courses in African history: History of Africa (256), an introductory course emphasizing the pre-colonial era; Modern Africa (313), a survey c. 1800 to the present; and Southern Africa (312), which emphasizes the history of South Africa. I also semi-regularly teach Cities in History (104), an introductory course in global urban history, as well as seminars in decolonization and in the writing of history. Beginning this spring, I will be teaching The Theory and Practice of History (399).

Research Interests

  • urban Africa
  • architecture and planning in history
  • informal settlement, housing, and citizenship
  • Mozambique in the twentieth century
  • Portuguese colonialism

Books

Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2019.

Articles/Book Chapters

Maputo.” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of African History (forthcoming).

The Shape of Aspiration: Clandestine Masonry House Construction in Lourenço Marques, Mozambique (1960-75).” Journal of African History 59, no. 2 (2018): 283-304.

A Voortrekker Memorial in Revolutionary Maputo.” Journal of Southern African Studies 41, no. 2 (2015): 335-352.

Chamanculo in Reeds, Wood, Zinc & Concrete.” S.L.U.M. Lab, no. 9 (2014): 43–46.

From Racial Discrimination to Class Segregation in Postcolonial Urban Mozambique.” In Geographies of Privilege, edited by France Winddance Twine and Bradley Gardener, 231-261. London: Routledge, 2013.

(with Allen F. Isaacman) “Harnessing the Zambezi: How Mozambique’s Planned Mphanda Nkuwa Dam Perpetuates the Colonial Past.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 45, no. 2 (2012): 157-190.

Aaron Wilford, M.A. student

Jake Harms, M.A. student

Hotel Universo, my research blog, has long been on hiatus, but it stores dozens of entries on the histories of Mozambique, Portugal, and elsewhere.