Tara Mayer

Associate Professor (Teaching)
location_on Buchanan Tower 1027, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

Education

Ph.D. History, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 2010

About

I am a cultural historian of colonial South Asia whose scholarship traces material and aesthetic exchanges between India, Britain, and France in ways that traverse the boundaries of my discipline. Through visual and textual sources that connect the metropole to the colony, my work explores the tension between Enlightenment ideas and the praxis of empire in the construction and contestation of European racial and gendered identities. I examine the deeply reciprocal processes of appropriation, assimilation, and influence that took place at the intersections of European and Asian material culture during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on the role of racism and colonial power in shaping these exchanges.

 

July 2020: “Photographing Black Lives Matter: An Interview with Sheila Pree Bright”


Research

My scholarship and pedagogy centre on two main themes: Critical Visual Literacy and Teaching Historical Controversy.

Critical Visual Literacy

We are living in a visual age, in which images have become the central medium for representing and interrogating all aspects of human experience. Digital technologies have fundamentally shifted the traditional ratio between textual and visual communication. As the beating heart of digital culture, visual communication has come to permeate almost every aspect of our personal, professional, and political lives. From a historical perspective, this explosion in our use of, and access to, images represents as radical a turning point as did the first information revolution brought about by Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press.

Defining, promoting, and implementing an agenda for visual literacy is a central part of my scholarly agenda at UBC. It is animated by my conviction that there can be no social justice without visual representational justice. My commitment to expanding our conversations, questions, and critiques about visual culture and consumption have led me to hold a symposium on teaching through material culture (Past Matters), to organize an international research roundtable on the interdisciplinary study of visuality (Visual Literacy), and to develop newm hands-on research opportunities for undergraduate students in local museum collections (Objects of Encounter).

Teaching Historical Controversy

As a historian of colonialism in South Asia, my research and teaching practice also engage deeply with difficult and traumatic histories. The modern history of the subcontinent is rife with human tragedy perpetuated by the multifarious violences of colonial ideology and action. I’ve sought to cultivate radically new ways of engaging with historical memory, trauma, and justice through emotion, subjectivity, story-telling, embodied expertise, and personal narrative. Supported by a seed grant from the Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL), I have led an expansive pilot study of student perceptions, experiences, and learning outcomes in teaching the traumatic histories of Partition in India, through pedagogies of discomfort.

I have presented this work at international conferences, including as part of a special roundtable on “Teaching about Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Conflict” at the 2019 Association for Asian Studies conference. Most recently, I’ve become the inaugural recipient of the Wall Residency in Innovative Pedagogy at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS) to create a film series entitled “On Feeling and Knowing”, which will explore the influence of emotion on epistemologies and disciplinary practices across our university and beyond.

 

Primary Research Interests

  • Colonial South Asian history
  • European constructions of race and gender in imperial contexts
  • Material culture (especially clothing)

Publications

Articles/Book Chapters

T. Mayer, “From Craft to Couture: Contemporary Indian Fashion in Historical Perspective”, South Asian Popular Culture, vol. 17, no. 1, 2019.

T. Mayer, “Artisanat et haute couture: une perspective historique sur la mode indienne contemporaine ”, in Artisanat et design: un dessein indien?, Bruxelles: Peter Lang, 2018.

T. Mayer and Unwalla, P., “Global 1918”, in Memory, Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2018.

T. Mayer, “Clothing the Enlightened Body: European Dress in India during the Age of Reason”, Purushartha: Éditions de l’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, no. 31, pp. 13-33, 2013.

T. Mayer, “Cultural Cross-Dressing: Posing and Performance in Orientalist Portraiture”, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 281-298, 2012.


Awards

Killam Teaching Prize (2019)


Tara Mayer

Associate Professor (Teaching)
email
location_on Buchanan Tower 1027, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

Ph.D. History, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 2010

I am a cultural historian of colonial South Asia whose scholarship traces material and aesthetic exchanges between India, Britain, and France in ways that traverse the boundaries of my discipline. Through visual and textual sources that connect the metropole to the colony, my work explores the tension between Enlightenment ideas and the praxis of empire in the construction and contestation of European racial and gendered identities. I examine the deeply reciprocal processes of appropriation, assimilation, and influence that took place at the intersections of European and Asian material culture during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on the role of racism and colonial power in shaping these exchanges.

 

July 2020: "Photographing Black Lives Matter: An Interview with Sheila Pree Bright"

My scholarship and pedagogy centre on two main themes: Critical Visual Literacy and Teaching Historical Controversy.

Critical Visual Literacy

We are living in a visual age, in which images have become the central medium for representing and interrogating all aspects of human experience. Digital technologies have fundamentally shifted the traditional ratio between textual and visual communication. As the beating heart of digital culture, visual communication has come to permeate almost every aspect of our personal, professional, and political lives. From a historical perspective, this explosion in our use of, and access to, images represents as radical a turning point as did the first information revolution brought about by Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press.

Defining, promoting, and implementing an agenda for visual literacy is a central part of my scholarly agenda at UBC. It is animated by my conviction that there can be no social justice without visual representational justice. My commitment to expanding our conversations, questions, and critiques about visual culture and consumption have led me to hold a symposium on teaching through material culture (Past Matters), to organize an international research roundtable on the interdisciplinary study of visuality (Visual Literacy), and to develop newm hands-on research opportunities for undergraduate students in local museum collections (Objects of Encounter).

Teaching Historical Controversy

As a historian of colonialism in South Asia, my research and teaching practice also engage deeply with difficult and traumatic histories. The modern history of the subcontinent is rife with human tragedy perpetuated by the multifarious violences of colonial ideology and action. I’ve sought to cultivate radically new ways of engaging with historical memory, trauma, and justice through emotion, subjectivity, story-telling, embodied expertise, and personal narrative. Supported by a seed grant from the Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL), I have led an expansive pilot study of student perceptions, experiences, and learning outcomes in teaching the traumatic histories of Partition in India, through pedagogies of discomfort.

I have presented this work at international conferences, including as part of a special roundtable on “Teaching about Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Conflict” at the 2019 Association for Asian Studies conference. Most recently, I’ve become the inaugural recipient of the Wall Residency in Innovative Pedagogy at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS) to create a film series entitled “On Feeling and Knowing”, which will explore the influence of emotion on epistemologies and disciplinary practices across our university and beyond.

 

Primary Research Interests

  • Colonial South Asian history
  • European constructions of race and gender in imperial contexts
  • Material culture (especially clothing)

Articles/Book Chapters

T. Mayer, “From Craft to Couture: Contemporary Indian Fashion in Historical Perspective”, South Asian Popular Culture, vol. 17, no. 1, 2019.

T. Mayer, “Artisanat et haute couture: une perspective historique sur la mode indienne contemporaine ”, in Artisanat et design: un dessein indien?, Bruxelles: Peter Lang, 2018.

T. Mayer and Unwalla, P., “Global 1918”, in Memory, Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2018.

T. Mayer, “Clothing the Enlightened Body: European Dress in India during the Age of Reason”, Purushartha: Éditions de l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, no. 31, pp. 13-33, 2013.

T. Mayer, “Cultural Cross-Dressing: Posing and Performance in Orientalist Portraiture”, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 281-298, 2012.

Killam Teaching Prize (2019)

Tara Mayer

Associate Professor (Teaching)
email
location_on Buchanan Tower 1027, 1873 East Mall, Vancouver , BC, V6T1Z1, Canada

Ph.D. History, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 2010

I am a cultural historian of colonial South Asia whose scholarship traces material and aesthetic exchanges between India, Britain, and France in ways that traverse the boundaries of my discipline. Through visual and textual sources that connect the metropole to the colony, my work explores the tension between Enlightenment ideas and the praxis of empire in the construction and contestation of European racial and gendered identities. I examine the deeply reciprocal processes of appropriation, assimilation, and influence that took place at the intersections of European and Asian material culture during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on the role of racism and colonial power in shaping these exchanges.

 

July 2020: "Photographing Black Lives Matter: An Interview with Sheila Pree Bright"

My scholarship and pedagogy centre on two main themes: Critical Visual Literacy and Teaching Historical Controversy.

Critical Visual Literacy

We are living in a visual age, in which images have become the central medium for representing and interrogating all aspects of human experience. Digital technologies have fundamentally shifted the traditional ratio between textual and visual communication. As the beating heart of digital culture, visual communication has come to permeate almost every aspect of our personal, professional, and political lives. From a historical perspective, this explosion in our use of, and access to, images represents as radical a turning point as did the first information revolution brought about by Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press.

Defining, promoting, and implementing an agenda for visual literacy is a central part of my scholarly agenda at UBC. It is animated by my conviction that there can be no social justice without visual representational justice. My commitment to expanding our conversations, questions, and critiques about visual culture and consumption have led me to hold a symposium on teaching through material culture (Past Matters), to organize an international research roundtable on the interdisciplinary study of visuality (Visual Literacy), and to develop newm hands-on research opportunities for undergraduate students in local museum collections (Objects of Encounter).

Teaching Historical Controversy

As a historian of colonialism in South Asia, my research and teaching practice also engage deeply with difficult and traumatic histories. The modern history of the subcontinent is rife with human tragedy perpetuated by the multifarious violences of colonial ideology and action. I’ve sought to cultivate radically new ways of engaging with historical memory, trauma, and justice through emotion, subjectivity, story-telling, embodied expertise, and personal narrative. Supported by a seed grant from the Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL), I have led an expansive pilot study of student perceptions, experiences, and learning outcomes in teaching the traumatic histories of Partition in India, through pedagogies of discomfort.

I have presented this work at international conferences, including as part of a special roundtable on “Teaching about Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Conflict” at the 2019 Association for Asian Studies conference. Most recently, I’ve become the inaugural recipient of the Wall Residency in Innovative Pedagogy at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS) to create a film series entitled “On Feeling and Knowing”, which will explore the influence of emotion on epistemologies and disciplinary practices across our university and beyond.

 

Primary Research Interests

  • Colonial South Asian history
  • European constructions of race and gender in imperial contexts
  • Material culture (especially clothing)

Articles/Book Chapters

T. Mayer, “From Craft to Couture: Contemporary Indian Fashion in Historical Perspective”, South Asian Popular Culture, vol. 17, no. 1, 2019.

T. Mayer, “Artisanat et haute couture: une perspective historique sur la mode indienne contemporaine ”, in Artisanat et design: un dessein indien?, Bruxelles: Peter Lang, 2018.

T. Mayer and Unwalla, P., “Global 1918”, in Memory, Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2018.

T. Mayer, “Clothing the Enlightened Body: European Dress in India during the Age of Reason”, Purushartha: Éditions de l'École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, no. 31, pp. 13-33, 2013.

T. Mayer, “Cultural Cross-Dressing: Posing and Performance in Orientalist Portraiture”, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 281-298, 2012.

Killam Teaching Prize (2019)