About

I work on communications and encounter in the eighteenth-century Atlantic, focussing on seamen. In addition, I work as an archivist and researcher on projects in Canadian history and Indigenous history.


Research

My dissertation, provisionally titled "Mariners and Misinformation in the American Atlantic, 1730-1800," assesses the role of Massachusetts and Rhode Island seamen in the information networks of the eighteenth-century Atlantic World. These networks were based on fishing, whaling, slaving, trading, and privateering voyages. Midcentury changes to these voyages amounted to a communications revolution.

I have published on British-Inuit trade in NunatuKavut in the article titled, "How to Win Friends and Trade with People," that analyzes how English and Inuit traders in eighteenth-century Labrador borrowed, mixed, re-borrowed, and remixed each other's labor regulation and trading practices.

Research Interest

  • Early North America in the Atlantic World
  • Media and communications history
  • Economic culture
  • Print culture
  • Maritime history
  • New England
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Southern Inuit

Publications

“How to Win Friends and Trade with People: Southern Inuit, George Cartwright, and Labrador Households, 1763 to 1809.” Acadiensis: Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region XLVI, no. 2 (Summer/Autumn 2017): 35–58.


Awards

Student Essay Prize, Institute for Social and Economic Research, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2018.

Lapidus Pre-Doctoral Short-term Fellowship, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2017.

Paul W. McQuillan Memorial Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, 2014.

J. Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada, 2008-2011.


Additional Description

Teaching

HIST 104 “The Americas from Colonization to Independence,” Simon Fraser University Department of History, Spring term 2018.


Stephen Hay

PhD Candidate

I work on communications and encounter in the eighteenth-century Atlantic, focussing on seamen. In addition, I work as an archivist and researcher on projects in Canadian history and Indigenous history.

My dissertation, provisionally titled "Mariners and Misinformation in the American Atlantic, 1730-1800," assesses the role of Massachusetts and Rhode Island seamen in the information networks of the eighteenth-century Atlantic World. These networks were based on fishing, whaling, slaving, trading, and privateering voyages. Midcentury changes to these voyages amounted to a communications revolution.

I have published on British-Inuit trade in NunatuKavut in the article titled, "How to Win Friends and Trade with People," that analyzes how English and Inuit traders in eighteenth-century Labrador borrowed, mixed, re-borrowed, and remixed each other's labor regulation and trading practices.

Research Interest

  • Early North America in the Atlantic World
  • Media and communications history
  • Economic culture
  • Print culture
  • Maritime history
  • New England
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Southern Inuit

“How to Win Friends and Trade with People: Southern Inuit, George Cartwright, and Labrador Households, 1763 to 1809.” Acadiensis: Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region XLVI, no. 2 (Summer/Autumn 2017): 35–58.

Student Essay Prize, Institute for Social and Economic Research, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2018.

Lapidus Pre-Doctoral Short-term Fellowship, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2017.

Paul W. McQuillan Memorial Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, 2014.

J. Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada, 2008-2011.

Teaching

HIST 104 “The Americas from Colonization to Independence,” Simon Fraser University Department of History, Spring term 2018.

Stephen Hay

PhD Candidate

I work on communications and encounter in the eighteenth-century Atlantic, focussing on seamen. In addition, I work as an archivist and researcher on projects in Canadian history and Indigenous history.

My dissertation, provisionally titled "Mariners and Misinformation in the American Atlantic, 1730-1800," assesses the role of Massachusetts and Rhode Island seamen in the information networks of the eighteenth-century Atlantic World. These networks were based on fishing, whaling, slaving, trading, and privateering voyages. Midcentury changes to these voyages amounted to a communications revolution.

I have published on British-Inuit trade in NunatuKavut in the article titled, "How to Win Friends and Trade with People," that analyzes how English and Inuit traders in eighteenth-century Labrador borrowed, mixed, re-borrowed, and remixed each other's labor regulation and trading practices.

Research Interest

  • Early North America in the Atlantic World
  • Media and communications history
  • Economic culture
  • Print culture
  • Maritime history
  • New England
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Southern Inuit

“How to Win Friends and Trade with People: Southern Inuit, George Cartwright, and Labrador Households, 1763 to 1809.” Acadiensis: Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region XLVI, no. 2 (Summer/Autumn 2017): 35–58.

Student Essay Prize, Institute for Social and Economic Research, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2018.

Lapidus Pre-Doctoral Short-term Fellowship, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2017.

Paul W. McQuillan Memorial Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, 2014.

J. Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship Doctoral Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada, 2008-2011.

Teaching

HIST 104 “The Americas from Colonization to Independence,” Simon Fraser University Department of History, Spring term 2018.