Peter Jones

PhD Student
location_on Rm 143, Auditorium Annex A 1924 West Mall V6T 1Z2
file_download Download CV
Regional Research Area
Education

PhD (in progress), University of British Columbia, 2017-2022 (supervisor: Dr. Courtney Booker)

MA, McGill University, 2012-2014 (supervisor: Dr. Nancy Partner)

BA (Medieval Studies & Classical Studies), University of British Columbia, 2006-2011


About

Born and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, I became fascinated by history in high school, a fascination in part due to having some great teachers, and in part to some independent reading (including classics like Beowulf, but also works of fiction, like JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion). I first came to UBC for my undergraduate studies, and to play varsity football. I initially pursued a BA in Archaeology because I liked the idea of working with the physical remains of the past. As I progressed into my degree, I gravitated back to history, becoming particularly interested in studying ancient historiography, or in other words, studying how ancient people thought about and wrote history, what history meant to them. My interest in this subject was especially influenced by Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis and Hayden White’s The Content of the Form, as well as by another great teacher, Dr. Courtney Booker.

After my BA, I went to Montreal to do an MA at McGill, where I was fortunate to be supervised by Dr. Nancy Partner, an eminent historian of medieval Europe, and of medieval historiography. There I doubled down on my historiography interests, writing a thesis focused on a literary critique of Gregory of Tours’ Histories, a history written in the sixth century AD, in what is today France. After finishing my MA, I went to work for the international development institute CIRDI, where I was an executive coordinator and governance officer. This was a very valuable opportunity to regularly work with scholars, civil servants, community leaders, and various industry professionals from all over the world, who are engaged in tackling the most pressing issues of natural resource governance (see more at https://cirdi.ca/).

Currently living in Vancouver, in my spare time I try to get outside for a run, bike or swim when I can (or, if I’m feeling less energetic, play the occasional video game). As I’m sure many can relate, the pandemic has changed many of my outdoor routines into indoor ones, and I find myself doing more and more calisthenics to counter the physical effects of studying at a desk all day.

TEACHING:

Teaching Assistant, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

  • History 280 – Islamic World History (January 1st – May 1st, 2020)
  • History 240 – Health, Illness and Medicine I: From the Ancient World to the Early Modern Period (September 1st –December 31st, 2019)
  • History 102 – World History: 1500 to the 20th Century (September 1st, 2018 – May 1st, 2019)
  • History 339 – The United States Since 1945: The Limits of Power (January 1st – May 1st, 2018)
  • History 104 – Topics in World History: The Origins of World Legal Traditions (September 1st – December 31st, 2017)

Teaching Assistant, McGill University, Montréal, QC

  • History 380 – Western Europe: The Middle Ages (September 1st – December 31st, 2012)

OFFICE HOUR:

Tuesday: 10:00-11:00


Research

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Following the Multiple Temporalities of Merovingian Gaul

  • In the sixth century AD, Gregory of Tours prefaced his Histories with curious remarks regarding time. In naming past historians on whom he relied—authors such as Eusebius, Jerome, and Orosius—and “following the order of times,” he imitated their style of weaving together multiple accounts “so that the centuries…down to our own times may be studied in their entirety” (trans. Thorpe 1974). To modern sensibilities, these phrases seem common, even banal, for a work of history. But Gregory’s terseness conceals a great deal, not least concerning the nature of the plural “times” he wove together in his history. We rely on his account for the early history of Merovingian Gaul, but have yet to reconcile his notions of time, and those of his society, with the modern history of Europe that has subsumed them. A tradition of historiographical condescension, combined with an interpretation of time as ‘naturally’ singular, linear, and universal has restricted our taking seriously Gregory’s multiple times, their impact on Merovingian history, and the extent to which these and other notions obtained in Merovingian society. My study reframes Merovingian history by considering temporal expressions on their own terms, unaffected by modern normative categories of historical time. I attempt to recover ‘time’ within Merovingian society as something multiple, dynamic, and shaped by political, economic, and social forces, and in so doing to write a history of temporal politics in Merovingian Gaul. This revisionist history contributes to a larger historiographical program that seeks to disengage medieval temporal concepts—and so medieval history—from the retroactively naturalizing categorizations of modernity, including antique/medieval/modern periodization, a culture of progress, linearity, and acceleration, and above all the hegemony of a singular temporal frame of reference.

Cursing in the writings of Gregory of Tours

  • An examination of cursing practices in Gregory of Tours’ history and hagiography, considering patterns of use, and rhetorical effects.

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Western Europe
  • Early Middle Ages/Late Antiquity
  • Historiography
  • Narrative
  • Merovingian kingdoms
  • Gregory of Tours
  • Notions of time and historical consciousness
  • Historical Theory

Publications

ARTICLES:

Jones, Peter. “Gregory of Tours’ Poetics.” In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 46 (2015), 1–30.

Jones, Peter. “From Bricoleur to Engineer: Truth in Early Medieval Western Europe.” In The Atlas: UBC Undergraduate Journal of World History, Vol. 8 (2013), 4–13.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Jones, Peter. Review of Andrew J. Romig, Be a Perfect Man: Christian Masculinity and Carolingian Aristocracy. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Killing and Being Killed: Bodies in Battle. Perspectives on Fighters in the Middle Ages, ed. Jörg Rogge. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Brian Stock, The Integrated Self: Augustine, The Bible, and Ancient Thought. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).

Jones, Peter. Review of Texts in Transit in the Medieval Mediterranean, ed. Y. Tzvi Langermann and Robert G. Morrison. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).


Awards

William Wray Award for Summer Research 2020

Bob Hindmarch Award – for outstanding academics and athletics

Frank Gnup Memorial Award – for outstanding academics and athletics


Peter Jones

PhD Student
location_on Rm 143, Auditorium Annex A 1924 West Mall V6T 1Z2
file_download Download CV
Regional Research Area
Education

PhD (in progress), University of British Columbia, 2017-2022 (supervisor: Dr. Courtney Booker)

MA, McGill University, 2012-2014 (supervisor: Dr. Nancy Partner)

BA (Medieval Studies & Classical Studies), University of British Columbia, 2006-2011


About

Born and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, I became fascinated by history in high school, a fascination in part due to having some great teachers, and in part to some independent reading (including classics like Beowulf, but also works of fiction, like JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion). I first came to UBC for my undergraduate studies, and to play varsity football. I initially pursued a BA in Archaeology because I liked the idea of working with the physical remains of the past. As I progressed into my degree, I gravitated back to history, becoming particularly interested in studying ancient historiography, or in other words, studying how ancient people thought about and wrote history, what history meant to them. My interest in this subject was especially influenced by Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis and Hayden White’s The Content of the Form, as well as by another great teacher, Dr. Courtney Booker.

After my BA, I went to Montreal to do an MA at McGill, where I was fortunate to be supervised by Dr. Nancy Partner, an eminent historian of medieval Europe, and of medieval historiography. There I doubled down on my historiography interests, writing a thesis focused on a literary critique of Gregory of Tours’ Histories, a history written in the sixth century AD, in what is today France. After finishing my MA, I went to work for the international development institute CIRDI, where I was an executive coordinator and governance officer. This was a very valuable opportunity to regularly work with scholars, civil servants, community leaders, and various industry professionals from all over the world, who are engaged in tackling the most pressing issues of natural resource governance (see more at https://cirdi.ca/).

Currently living in Vancouver, in my spare time I try to get outside for a run, bike or swim when I can (or, if I’m feeling less energetic, play the occasional video game). As I’m sure many can relate, the pandemic has changed many of my outdoor routines into indoor ones, and I find myself doing more and more calisthenics to counter the physical effects of studying at a desk all day.

TEACHING:

Teaching Assistant, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

  • History 280 – Islamic World History (January 1st – May 1st, 2020)
  • History 240 – Health, Illness and Medicine I: From the Ancient World to the Early Modern Period (September 1st –December 31st, 2019)
  • History 102 – World History: 1500 to the 20th Century (September 1st, 2018 – May 1st, 2019)
  • History 339 – The United States Since 1945: The Limits of Power (January 1st – May 1st, 2018)
  • History 104 – Topics in World History: The Origins of World Legal Traditions (September 1st – December 31st, 2017)

Teaching Assistant, McGill University, Montréal, QC

  • History 380 – Western Europe: The Middle Ages (September 1st – December 31st, 2012)

OFFICE HOUR:

Tuesday: 10:00-11:00


Research

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Following the Multiple Temporalities of Merovingian Gaul

  • In the sixth century AD, Gregory of Tours prefaced his Histories with curious remarks regarding time. In naming past historians on whom he relied—authors such as Eusebius, Jerome, and Orosius—and “following the order of times,” he imitated their style of weaving together multiple accounts “so that the centuries…down to our own times may be studied in their entirety” (trans. Thorpe 1974). To modern sensibilities, these phrases seem common, even banal, for a work of history. But Gregory’s terseness conceals a great deal, not least concerning the nature of the plural “times” he wove together in his history. We rely on his account for the early history of Merovingian Gaul, but have yet to reconcile his notions of time, and those of his society, with the modern history of Europe that has subsumed them. A tradition of historiographical condescension, combined with an interpretation of time as ‘naturally’ singular, linear, and universal has restricted our taking seriously Gregory’s multiple times, their impact on Merovingian history, and the extent to which these and other notions obtained in Merovingian society. My study reframes Merovingian history by considering temporal expressions on their own terms, unaffected by modern normative categories of historical time. I attempt to recover ‘time’ within Merovingian society as something multiple, dynamic, and shaped by political, economic, and social forces, and in so doing to write a history of temporal politics in Merovingian Gaul. This revisionist history contributes to a larger historiographical program that seeks to disengage medieval temporal concepts—and so medieval history—from the retroactively naturalizing categorizations of modernity, including antique/medieval/modern periodization, a culture of progress, linearity, and acceleration, and above all the hegemony of a singular temporal frame of reference.

Cursing in the writings of Gregory of Tours

  • An examination of cursing practices in Gregory of Tours’ history and hagiography, considering patterns of use, and rhetorical effects.

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Western Europe
  • Early Middle Ages/Late Antiquity
  • Historiography
  • Narrative
  • Merovingian kingdoms
  • Gregory of Tours
  • Notions of time and historical consciousness
  • Historical Theory

Publications

ARTICLES:

Jones, Peter. “Gregory of Tours’ Poetics.” In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 46 (2015), 1–30.

Jones, Peter. “From Bricoleur to Engineer: Truth in Early Medieval Western Europe.” In The Atlas: UBC Undergraduate Journal of World History, Vol. 8 (2013), 4–13.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Jones, Peter. Review of Andrew J. Romig, Be a Perfect Man: Christian Masculinity and Carolingian Aristocracy. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Killing and Being Killed: Bodies in Battle. Perspectives on Fighters in the Middle Ages, ed. Jörg Rogge. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Brian Stock, The Integrated Self: Augustine, The Bible, and Ancient Thought. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).

Jones, Peter. Review of Texts in Transit in the Medieval Mediterranean, ed. Y. Tzvi Langermann and Robert G. Morrison. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).


Awards

William Wray Award for Summer Research 2020

Bob Hindmarch Award – for outstanding academics and athletics

Frank Gnup Memorial Award – for outstanding academics and athletics


Peter Jones

PhD Student
location_on Rm 143, Auditorium Annex A 1924 West Mall V6T 1Z2
Regional Research Area
Education

PhD (in progress), University of British Columbia, 2017-2022 (supervisor: Dr. Courtney Booker)

MA, McGill University, 2012-2014 (supervisor: Dr. Nancy Partner)

BA (Medieval Studies & Classical Studies), University of British Columbia, 2006-2011

file_download Download CV
About keyboard_arrow_down

Born and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, I became fascinated by history in high school, a fascination in part due to having some great teachers, and in part to some independent reading (including classics like Beowulf, but also works of fiction, like JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion). I first came to UBC for my undergraduate studies, and to play varsity football. I initially pursued a BA in Archaeology because I liked the idea of working with the physical remains of the past. As I progressed into my degree, I gravitated back to history, becoming particularly interested in studying ancient historiography, or in other words, studying how ancient people thought about and wrote history, what history meant to them. My interest in this subject was especially influenced by Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis and Hayden White’s The Content of the Form, as well as by another great teacher, Dr. Courtney Booker.

After my BA, I went to Montreal to do an MA at McGill, where I was fortunate to be supervised by Dr. Nancy Partner, an eminent historian of medieval Europe, and of medieval historiography. There I doubled down on my historiography interests, writing a thesis focused on a literary critique of Gregory of Tours’ Histories, a history written in the sixth century AD, in what is today France. After finishing my MA, I went to work for the international development institute CIRDI, where I was an executive coordinator and governance officer. This was a very valuable opportunity to regularly work with scholars, civil servants, community leaders, and various industry professionals from all over the world, who are engaged in tackling the most pressing issues of natural resource governance (see more at https://cirdi.ca/).

Currently living in Vancouver, in my spare time I try to get outside for a run, bike or swim when I can (or, if I’m feeling less energetic, play the occasional video game). As I’m sure many can relate, the pandemic has changed many of my outdoor routines into indoor ones, and I find myself doing more and more calisthenics to counter the physical effects of studying at a desk all day.

TEACHING:

Teaching Assistant, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

  • History 280 – Islamic World History (January 1st – May 1st, 2020)
  • History 240 – Health, Illness and Medicine I: From the Ancient World to the Early Modern Period (September 1st –December 31st, 2019)
  • History 102 – World History: 1500 to the 20th Century (September 1st, 2018 – May 1st, 2019)
  • History 339 – The United States Since 1945: The Limits of Power (January 1st – May 1st, 2018)
  • History 104 – Topics in World History: The Origins of World Legal Traditions (September 1st – December 31st, 2017)

Teaching Assistant, McGill University, Montréal, QC

  • History 380 – Western Europe: The Middle Ages (September 1st – December 31st, 2012)

OFFICE HOUR:

Tuesday: 10:00-11:00

Research keyboard_arrow_down

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Following the Multiple Temporalities of Merovingian Gaul

  • In the sixth century AD, Gregory of Tours prefaced his Histories with curious remarks regarding time. In naming past historians on whom he relied—authors such as Eusebius, Jerome, and Orosius—and “following the order of times,” he imitated their style of weaving together multiple accounts “so that the centuries…down to our own times may be studied in their entirety” (trans. Thorpe 1974). To modern sensibilities, these phrases seem common, even banal, for a work of history. But Gregory’s terseness conceals a great deal, not least concerning the nature of the plural “times” he wove together in his history. We rely on his account for the early history of Merovingian Gaul, but have yet to reconcile his notions of time, and those of his society, with the modern history of Europe that has subsumed them. A tradition of historiographical condescension, combined with an interpretation of time as ‘naturally’ singular, linear, and universal has restricted our taking seriously Gregory’s multiple times, their impact on Merovingian history, and the extent to which these and other notions obtained in Merovingian society. My study reframes Merovingian history by considering temporal expressions on their own terms, unaffected by modern normative categories of historical time. I attempt to recover ‘time’ within Merovingian society as something multiple, dynamic, and shaped by political, economic, and social forces, and in so doing to write a history of temporal politics in Merovingian Gaul. This revisionist history contributes to a larger historiographical program that seeks to disengage medieval temporal concepts—and so medieval history—from the retroactively naturalizing categorizations of modernity, including antique/medieval/modern periodization, a culture of progress, linearity, and acceleration, and above all the hegemony of a singular temporal frame of reference.

Cursing in the writings of Gregory of Tours

  • An examination of cursing practices in Gregory of Tours’ history and hagiography, considering patterns of use, and rhetorical effects.

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Western Europe
  • Early Middle Ages/Late Antiquity
  • Historiography
  • Narrative
  • Merovingian kingdoms
  • Gregory of Tours
  • Notions of time and historical consciousness
  • Historical Theory
Publications keyboard_arrow_down

ARTICLES:

Jones, Peter. “Gregory of Tours’ Poetics.” In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 46 (2015), 1–30.

Jones, Peter. “From Bricoleur to Engineer: Truth in Early Medieval Western Europe.” In The Atlas: UBC Undergraduate Journal of World History, Vol. 8 (2013), 4–13.

BOOK REVIEWS:

Jones, Peter. Review of Andrew J. Romig, Be a Perfect Man: Christian Masculinity and Carolingian Aristocracy. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Killing and Being Killed: Bodies in Battle. Perspectives on Fighters in the Middle Ages, ed. Jörg Rogge. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 49 (2018).

Jones, Peter. Review of Brian Stock, The Integrated Self: Augustine, The Bible, and Ancient Thought. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).

Jones, Peter. Review of Texts in Transit in the Medieval Mediterranean, ed. Y. Tzvi Langermann and Robert G. Morrison. In Comitatus: A Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Vol. 48 (2017).

Awards keyboard_arrow_down

William Wray Award for Summer Research 2020

Bob Hindmarch Award – for outstanding academics and athletics

Frank Gnup Memorial Award – for outstanding academics and athletics