María L. O. Muñoz

Visiting Associate Professor
location_on Ponderosa E - 227

Research Area

Education

Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2009
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2004
B.A., University of La Verne, 2001

Research

My first book, Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984, examined the First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples in Mexico in 1975. Often disregarded as a state-driven event that was ceremonial at best, the congress, as often is the case, was much more complex. In the process of conducting archival research across Mexico (national, state, local and personal archives), the history of the congress revealed struggles between national, state, and local leaders, indigenous leaders and non-indigenous leaders, indigenous leaders and their communities, and indigenous leaders within their own leadership organization, the National Council of Indigenous Peoples. In Stand Up and Fight, I argue that the arena of contention, the spaces where struggles were taking place, was constantly changing and that a number of issues were being negotiated and renegotiated. Indigenous peoples presented demands for full citizenship, dignity and self-determination, while engaging in debates over indigenous identity and what and who determined indigeneity. The 1975 First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples also renewed the national conversation over the failures of the Mexican government to fulfill the social, economic and political promises of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, with indigenous peoples keen to remind the state of what was still owed.

My second book project, Legacies of Violence: Indigenous Mobilizations, Human Rights and the Cold War in Latin America, branches out from Stand Up and Fight. In the new project I am examining different forms of violence and the ways state repressive mechanisms targeted indigenous peoples within the context of global discussions over human rights running parallel to Cold War politics. I use the 1971 Barbados I Conference, where a groups of American scholars (continental definition) declared themselves in alliance with indigenous communities throughout the Americas and supported their demands for political and cultural self-determination. Rather than highlight the anthropologists and journalists who formed the core of intellectual allies, I use them to get at the struggles of the communities they supported. Such struggles were framed in local, regional, national and hemispheric contexts.


Publications

Books:

Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism and Indigenous Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984 (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016).

Amelia Kiddle and María L. O. Muñoz, Populism in 20th Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría (Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2010).

 

Peer Reviewed Chapters and Articles:

María L.O. Muñoz “Espionage, Violence and Indigenous Agency in Mexico, 1965-1985” (Revising for journal publication)

María L.O. Muñoz, “Indigenous Mobilizations and the Mexican State During the 20th Century,”in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History, William H. Beezley ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019). Online publication date, November 2016).  http://latinamericanhistory.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199366439.001.0001/acrefore-9780199366439-e-30?rskey=ethOiN&result=4

María L.O. Muñoz, “State Spying on the State: Consejo Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas Meetings in 1980,” Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research, 19:1 (July 2013): 62-70.

María L.O. Muñoz, “De Pie y En Lucha!’: Indigenous Mobilizations After 1940,” In A Companion to Mexican History and Culture, William H. Beezley ed. (Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell Publishers, 2011).


María L. O. Muñoz

Visiting Associate Professor
location_on Ponderosa E - 227

Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2009
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2004
B.A., University of La Verne, 2001

My first book, Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984, examined the First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples in Mexico in 1975. Often disregarded as a state-driven event that was ceremonial at best, the congress, as often is the case, was much more complex. In the process of conducting archival research across Mexico (national, state, local and personal archives), the history of the congress revealed struggles between national, state, and local leaders, indigenous leaders and non-indigenous leaders, indigenous leaders and their communities, and indigenous leaders within their own leadership organization, the National Council of Indigenous Peoples. In Stand Up and Fight, I argue that the arena of contention, the spaces where struggles were taking place, was constantly changing and that a number of issues were being negotiated and renegotiated. Indigenous peoples presented demands for full citizenship, dignity and self-determination, while engaging in debates over indigenous identity and what and who determined indigeneity. The 1975 First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples also renewed the national conversation over the failures of the Mexican government to fulfill the social, economic and political promises of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, with indigenous peoples keen to remind the state of what was still owed.

My second book project, Legacies of Violence: Indigenous Mobilizations, Human Rights and the Cold War in Latin America, branches out from Stand Up and Fight. In the new project I am examining different forms of violence and the ways state repressive mechanisms targeted indigenous peoples within the context of global discussions over human rights running parallel to Cold War politics. I use the 1971 Barbados I Conference, where a groups of American scholars (continental definition) declared themselves in alliance with indigenous communities throughout the Americas and supported their demands for political and cultural self-determination. Rather than highlight the anthropologists and journalists who formed the core of intellectual allies, I use them to get at the struggles of the communities they supported. Such struggles were framed in local, regional, national and hemispheric contexts.

Books:

Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism and Indigenous Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984 (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016).

Amelia Kiddle and María L. O. Muñoz, Populism in 20th Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría (Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2010).

 

Peer Reviewed Chapters and Articles:

María L.O. Muñoz “Espionage, Violence and Indigenous Agency in Mexico, 1965-1985” (Revising for journal publication)

María L.O. Muñoz, “Indigenous Mobilizations and the Mexican State During the 20th Century,”in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History, William H. Beezley ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019). Online publication date, November 2016).  http://latinamericanhistory.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199366439.001.0001/acrefore-9780199366439-e-30?rskey=ethOiN&result=4

María L.O. Muñoz, “State Spying on the State: Consejo Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas Meetings in 1980,” Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research, 19:1 (July 2013): 62-70.

María L.O. Muñoz, “De Pie y En Lucha!’: Indigenous Mobilizations After 1940,” In A Companion to Mexican History and Culture, William H. Beezley ed. (Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell Publishers, 2011).

María L. O. Muñoz

Visiting Associate Professor
location_on Ponderosa E - 227

Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2009
M.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2004
B.A., University of La Verne, 2001

My first book, Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984, examined the First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples in Mexico in 1975. Often disregarded as a state-driven event that was ceremonial at best, the congress, as often is the case, was much more complex. In the process of conducting archival research across Mexico (national, state, local and personal archives), the history of the congress revealed struggles between national, state, and local leaders, indigenous leaders and non-indigenous leaders, indigenous leaders and their communities, and indigenous leaders within their own leadership organization, the National Council of Indigenous Peoples. In Stand Up and Fight, I argue that the arena of contention, the spaces where struggles were taking place, was constantly changing and that a number of issues were being negotiated and renegotiated. Indigenous peoples presented demands for full citizenship, dignity and self-determination, while engaging in debates over indigenous identity and what and who determined indigeneity. The 1975 First National Congress of Indigenous Peoples also renewed the national conversation over the failures of the Mexican government to fulfill the social, economic and political promises of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, with indigenous peoples keen to remind the state of what was still owed.

My second book project, Legacies of Violence: Indigenous Mobilizations, Human Rights and the Cold War in Latin America, branches out from Stand Up and Fight. In the new project I am examining different forms of violence and the ways state repressive mechanisms targeted indigenous peoples within the context of global discussions over human rights running parallel to Cold War politics. I use the 1971 Barbados I Conference, where a groups of American scholars (continental definition) declared themselves in alliance with indigenous communities throughout the Americas and supported their demands for political and cultural self-determination. Rather than highlight the anthropologists and journalists who formed the core of intellectual allies, I use them to get at the struggles of the communities they supported. Such struggles were framed in local, regional, national and hemispheric contexts.

Books:

Stand Up and Fight: Participatory Indigenismo, Populism and Indigenous Mobilization in Mexico, 1970-1984 (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016).

Amelia Kiddle and María L. O. Muñoz, Populism in 20th Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría (Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2010).

 

Peer Reviewed Chapters and Articles:

María L.O. Muñoz “Espionage, Violence and Indigenous Agency in Mexico, 1965-1985” (Revising for journal publication)

María L.O. Muñoz, “Indigenous Mobilizations and the Mexican State During the 20th Century,”in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History, William H. Beezley ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019). Online publication date, November 2016).  http://latinamericanhistory.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199366439.001.0001/acrefore-9780199366439-e-30?rskey=ethOiN&result=4

María L.O. Muñoz, “State Spying on the State: Consejo Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas Meetings in 1980,” Journal of Iberian and Latin American Research, 19:1 (July 2013): 62-70.

María L.O. Muñoz, “De Pie y En Lucha!’: Indigenous Mobilizations After 1940,” In A Companion to Mexican History and Culture, William H. Beezley ed. (Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell Publishers, 2011).